Earth Day will come and go…

But the overwhelming challenges facing our only inhabitable planet will not.  Those will still be here tomorrow.  So let’s get louder.  Today, tomorrow and the next… until we are heard:

Tell Mayors, Prime Ministers, Presidents, too, how very important the Earth is to you.

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The World We Made… it’s enough to make you throw your recycling bin in the trash can. Or is it? A must read by Jonathon Porritt.

While scientists and environmentalists are well intentioned with their daily projections of our not so distant future dystopian world order and subsequent extinction it can put a real damper on the day.  The struggles of our grandparents can seem downright quaint in today’s post climate change world… the age old mantra “life goes on” a phrase twenty somethings of today might wear ironically on their t-shirts.

Can you blame them?  The daily challenge of survival is no longer limited to ourselves as individuals, our individual communities or even entire populations but now encompasses every last one of us, including all future generations and/or the lack thereof.  It’s enough to make you throw your recycling bin in the trash can.

The answer?  I have no idea.  But I am inclined to think that a very good start would be for all of us to run to the bookstore or the internet and grab a copy of The World We Made, an imaginary memoir written in the year 2050 by history teacher Alex McKay.  The author, Jonathon Porritt, who just returned from the World Future Energy Summit in Abu Dhabi is a founding member of The Forum for The Future, an environmentalist and no lightweight in the scientific and technology community.  This green futurist believes that we already have the technology to create a sustainable, progressive world in which environmental, economic and social advances are shared, maintained and enjoyed by all.  The catch?  We must also believe that this is doable.  It’s fundamental.  If we don’t collectively believe that it is doable it simply won’t get done.

I’m in.  I’m gonna get the book.  And I’m gonna believe.  How about you?

Buy the book here.  Read an interview with the author here.

“The World We Made presents a credible vision of the world in 2050 – a world that is connected, collaborative and genuinely sustainable. This is the biggest thing I’m working on at the moment. We simply have to change the ‘mood music’ in terms of the way people feel about sustainability, and that means that everything we do in Forum for the Future is about positive solutions to today’s converging sustainability challenges.”   Jonathon Porritt, Author of The World We Made

“In a world where doom and gloom surrounds us everywhere, Jonathon Porritt shows us that another future is possible. . . Jonathon is arguably more responsible for helping to create that positive future than anyone I know.”   Jeffrey Hollender, Co-founder of Seventh Generation and Co-chair of Greenpeace US

Continued thanks to Amazon reviewers of Long Live Earth…

*****5.0 out of 5 stars   See all reviews here.
“Wonderful Book for Earth Day or any day!”
January 10, 2014 by mbscott “mbs” (Buffalo, NY)
“I read this for Eath Day every year to the K kids–great book about taking care of the planet. Good for budding Evolutionists, too, as it references the earth being way older than 6000 years–and prehistoric man! The illustrations are actually quilt squares–beautiful.”
Thank you Amazon reviewers for continuing to send in your kind thoughts!

That’s it. No more shopping. No more Amazon. Time’s up!

Go home. Slow down. Shut off the computer (myself included). May your Christmas be simple and bright.Miniskirts_in_snow_storm

Image from Agathos

Please would you share this? Last free ship day on Amazon and 20% off

The big day is closing in but there’s  still time to tuck Long Live Earth’s Anniversary Edition under the tree.  Perfect for all those budding environmentalists… and no batteries required!  Happy and safe holidays to all.
Many thanks and warmest wishes, MeighanLLE front:back jpeg

“Horrors! Environmental wacko nonsense… yuck!” Another favorite review.

Magilla_GorillaThis is one of my favorite Long Live Earth reviews.   I get such a kick out of it:
1.0 out of 5 stars Horrors!, July 10, 2002
By Sherry Poppins
This review is from: Long Live Earth (Paperback)
“What a bunch of environmentalist wacko nonsense! Ms. Morrison is over the top. Of course recycling is a necessary thing, however, we didn’t crawl out of the sea and evolve from apes. This book starts out very depressing, going on about what a state the earth is in. This is not a book for any parent wishing to teach their child(ren) about God’s creation of the world. Yuck! Ironically, the trees cut down to print this book could have been much better served.”

I’d be lying if I said I didn’t also get a real kick in the pants out of this comment addressing Ms. Poppins’ review:

Initial post: Jan 23, 2012 12:41:37 PM PST
Anna M. Lightenberg says: “Oh, yes, by all means, let’s not teach our children things like reality, and facts. Let’s just stuff their heads full of superstition and fantasy. Really? I don’t understand when religious people morphed into these wacky anti-science people. Guess this will just be one more way that evolution will thin the herd, when the under-educated, magical thinkers die off. Sad, because when I was a kid the religious schools cranked out the best science students.”
What she said. 🙂

EVOLUTION AS HISTORICAL FICTION?

Here’s a good one.  Amazon just categorized Long Live Earth as historical fiction:

Amazon Best Sellers Rank:  #54 in Books > Children’s Books > Literature & Fiction > Historical Fiction > Prehistory

I guess it was presumptuous of me but I assumed that an evolution theme would be lumped in somewhere (anywhere) amongst the non-fiction.  Read the first first few pages of Long Live Earth below…  pretty straightforward stuff.

Who is pulling those levers over there anyway?  Is the Great Oz of Amazon a Creationist?  Or is just his algorithm a Creationist?

LONG LIVE EARTH p.1

LONG LIVE EARTH p.2

LONG LIVE EARTH p.3

LONG LIVE EARTH p. 4

 

Oh well. If Long Live Earth (and evolution) have to be categorized as prehistorical fiction I should at least be grateful that it has made the top 100 in that list.  I think.  :-/