Long Live Earth’s Amazon Top 50, Vine Voice, 5 Star Review *****

Page-26-BigHeartI am feeling very humbled.  Twenty years on I had hoped that people would still be appreciative of the topical message and patched up illustrations of Long Live Earth’s Anniversary Edition.  But I never expected reviews like these last few.  Here is the most recent review from a true blue Top 50, Vine Voice Amazon reviewer.  Wow.  Many heartfelt thanks to L.M. Keefer:

*****5.0 out of 5 stars 
Charming, Colorful and Creative Book for Children on Caring for the Earth,
December 10, 2013
This review is from: Long Live Earth (Paperback)

If you are looking for a charming, colorful and creative book to teach children about taking care of our earth, this book delights. The illustrations embody the philosophy: they are quilt squares, making use of unused fabric. Each illustration is imaginatively conceived and stitched. Children will have fun talking about what they see in the squares. The illustrations are quite winsome.

The book is brimming with actionable ideas on what children can do to take care of our beautiful earth: waste less, use non-chemical sprays, don’t litter, take the train or bus when you can, plant a garden, recycle etc. The book can be a catalyst for an adult to think together of ideas with a child on how to take care of the earth. It would also be wonderful in a classroom to think of a class project on how they can care for the earth. Then, for an art activity, the students could create a patchwork square of their own out of collage materials to illustrate something they love about the exquisite earth that is worth preserving. The squares could be placed together on a bulletin board. When I taught preschool and elementary classes, I would ask design stores for any leftover wallpaper books and use the wallpaper for art projects as the wallpaper was patterned like fabric but could be glued instead of stitched.

For parents who care about cultivating a care for the earth in their children, this book enchants. It has depth. The author wrote in the forward that some years ago she was looking for a book to teach her son care for the earth. When she couldn’t find what she was looking for, she wrote this book and stitched the quilt squares. She has designed textiles for the home furnishings industry, exhibited her award winning art internationally and studied art at Parsons School of Design and Boston University. The art is truly fetching. Quilters and home schools would appreciate this book, too.

Honored to be receiving such kind reviews…

Jan GreeneNov 18, 2013 Jan Greene rated it 5 of 5 stars

Recommends it for: Parents and teachers of kids K-5.

A great book to remind kids about caring for the environment. The quilted artwork is pretty incredible too! I will read this to each of my grandchildren.

I thought this book was very cute and helps raise good points on what we can do to help our environment and world. It is easy for a child to understand how they can help. I cannot imagine how long it took to make each quilt square. The amount of detail is unbelievable. I am very honored to have received this since it was out of print for so many years. I am glad that it is back in print because this is a topic that we should be teaching our children today.

Charles Darwin’s BFF – A Paper Puppet Animation of A.R. Wallace

Speaking of evolution (see yesterday’s post “Evolution as Historical Fiction?” ) I think we’re all familiar with the term Darwinism.  But have you heard of Wallacism?  Nah, me neither. Probably because I just made it up.

Most of us automatically equate evolution with Charles Darwin, or Darwinism.  We do not equate it with his determined, humble, largely forgotten and charmingly generous friend A.R. Wallace.  In fact, most of us have never even heard of A.R. Wallace.  Or Wallacism.  Again, probably because I just made it up.

All the more reason to watch this quirky paper puppet animation celebrating Wallacism and the life and adventures of the other father of evolution.  That was the third reference to the term Wallacism which now makes it an officially coined phrase.  Maybe.  I don’t know if it actually works like that.  I just made that up. Sometimes it’s just easier to make things up than to go to the trouble of proving every little thing. Thankfully, Darwin and Wallace went to the trouble.  They did not deal in fiction or make things up.

Speaking of fiction and making things up, let’s hope Amazon has not lumped Darwin (and Wallace’s) The Origin of the Species into their prehistoric fiction category alongside Long Live Earth.  But if they did I hope it also made it into the top 100.  I think.  :-/

BY FLORA LICHTMAN AND SHARON SHATTUCKNovember 4th, 2013 from the New York Times.

EVOLUTION AS HISTORICAL FICTION?

Here’s a good one.  Amazon just categorized Long Live Earth as historical fiction:

Amazon Best Sellers Rank:  #54 in Books > Children’s Books > Literature & Fiction > Historical Fiction > Prehistory

I guess it was presumptuous of me but I assumed that an evolution theme would be lumped in somewhere (anywhere) amongst the non-fiction.  Read the first first few pages of Long Live Earth below…  pretty straightforward stuff.

Who is pulling those levers over there anyway?  Is the Great Oz of Amazon a Creationist?  Or is just his algorithm a Creationist?

LONG LIVE EARTH p.1

LONG LIVE EARTH p.2

LONG LIVE EARTH p.3

LONG LIVE EARTH p. 4

 

Oh well. If Long Live Earth (and evolution) have to be categorized as prehistorical fiction I should at least be grateful that it has made the top 100 in that list.  I think.  :-/

 

WHEN YOU WISH UPON A NEW MOON…

The new moon begins tonight, precisely at 7:22 pm eastern standard time…

small moon

I know this because my friend Helen told me so last weekend.  A little background – Helen was definitely some kind of Glinda the Good Witch in a former life.  It’s not documented or anything, but if you met her you would agree.

Astronomically the new moon occurs when the moon is positioned precisely between the earth and the sun and just a sliver of it’s light, if any, can be seen.  Astrologically this occurrence signifies new life, new beginnings, rebirth and optimism.  As such the new moon is the ideal time  to make a wish, up to ten to be exact, and then toss them out into the universe.

Kinda weird that when I decided to launch a new anniversary edition of Long Live Earth I chose today, December 2. I did so for several reasons, none of them related to the moon, new or not.  But they say there are no coincidences.  The older I get the more I tend to agree.  Here’s to new editions, new beginnings and new journeys.

Here’s to all your wishes coming true.

GAMES FOR CHANGE – Catalyzing Social Impact Through Digital Games

Games for Change is the leading global advocate for supporting and making games for social impact.  Non-profit curators of 138 very cool, very innovative video games.  Their games?  Awesome.  Their mission?  Game changing.  

WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING  “At least two generations of people have grown up with games and … it is part of their DNA to want to express themselves in that form. The bandwidth [of videogame emotion] is usually tension and competition—a sense of aggression. That’s changing.” Tracy Fullerton, professor at the University of Southern California

Mission Statement:

Catalyzing Social Impact Through Digital Games

What they do:

Founded in 2004, Games for Change facilitates the creation and distribution of social impact games that serve as critical tools in humanitarian and educational efforts.

WHAT PEOPLE ARE PLAYING

Neocolonialism_FeaturedImage

Ruin the world by manipulating parliaments and exploiting the working class. Also, the map isgame details
Dumbwaystodie2

“I solemnly swear to not do dumb stuff around trains.”game details
CodeFred

How do your body’s systems work? Learn by helping Fred survive a terrifying night in the woods.game details
ClimateDefense

Can you prevent global warming? “Let’s Pretend.”game details
ZombiesRun_Featured

Need motivation to exercise? Try outrunning the zombie apocalypse.game details
PlagueInc_Featured

Infect as many people as possible before humanity finds a cure.game details
SideKickCycle

Every 387 downloads of this bike racing game sends a bicycle to an impoverished community.game details
UpliftedFeature

Launch your character across challenging platforms in a quest to become happy.game details
SuperSightFeature

Battle against your fears to learn problem-solving strategies.game details
BioharmoniousFeature

Resolve the desolation of the balance between nature and machinery.game details
and many, many more…

1018 Thanks. And counting.

When I started the relaunch of Long Live Earth 6 weeks ago I didn’t know what to expect.  Yesterday the website broke a thousand views – many, many thanks to all that have taken the time in their busy days in this busy world to take a peak.  Only 5 days left to pre-order  – 10% of proceeds from all pre-orders to be donated to 350.0rg (working tirelessly to solve the climate crisis).  A happy and safe Thanksgiving to all.

Earth home stanz pic

Can’t See The Forest For the Trees…

In this case the trees are dollars and the forest is the future of our children.

images-2

I live in town where Helen Keller once lived.  The middle school is named for her and there are reminders of her peppered throughout the school and the town.  I think of her often.  It’s difficult to imagine the challenges she faced.  We all know her story.  She was both deaf and blind but that did not stop her from being able to see or from being able to hear.  Or from being able to speak her wisdom.

Alone we can do so little; together we can do so much.”  –  Helen Keller

All of you folks at the UN climate talks (that includes you, Australia, and you, America and Japan and Canada and the list goes on)… listen up.  Here is the latest report card on your progress (or lack thereof).

It’s not good enough. Not even close.

From the Voice of America
FINANCIAL DISPUTES HAMPER UN CLIMATE TALKS
Pamela Dockins

November 21, 2013

WASHINGTON — Disputes over finances have hampered progress at U.N. climate talks in Poland as delegates debate how to best provide aid to help developing countries fight global warming.
 
Meanwhile, a small group of protesters outside the talks expressed displeasure over how financial issues have bogged down efforts to prevent climate change.
 
Developing countries are challenging wealthy nations to follow through on a pledge to allocate $100 billion a year to help them deal with climate change. The commitment is supposed to be in place by 2020, yet there is concern that industrialized nations are not living up to that promise, according to Simon Bradshaw, a climate change spokesman at Oxfam.
 
“The worry is that developed countries just have not delivered fast enough on the finance commitments that were made right back in 2009. We have seen very little new money on the table this year and we have not seen strong, credible plans from any country on how they are going to scale up their contributions,” said Bradshaw.
 
The talks on climate change are taking place as the Philippines continues to reel after being devastated by Typhoon Haiyan.
 
The World Bank estimated that global economic losses causes by extreme weather — such as this storm — have risen to nearly $200 billion annually and could continue to rise as climate change worsens.
 
However, the talks have come at a time when many industrialized nations are trying to spur growth in their stagnant economies.
 
“We cannot have a system where there will be automatic compensation whenever severe weather events are happening in one place or other around the planet.  You can understand why this is not feasible,” said Connie Hedegaard, the European Commissioner for Climate Action.
 
Mary Sering, the Philippine representative at the talks, criticized the lack of an agreement on greenhouse gas emissions.
 
“If we are to review our progress, would it be right for me to conclude that we failed miserably?  Looking at science and how it manifested itself, not only at Typhoon Haiyan but also other events, like Katrina in the United States, the heat wave in France, the wildfires in Australia, and other extreme events occurring after observed increased warming, should we not be all ashamed being here?” asked Sering.
 
The conference continues through Friday. The group hopes to lay the groundwork for a 2015 climate agreement.

 

LONG LIVE EARTH as featured on YOUR ORGANIC CHILD

Enter To Win A Signed Copy Of Long Live Earth by Meighan Morrison.

By KAT | Published: NOVEMBER 11, 2013

Enter to win a signed copy of LONG LIVE EARTH by Meigan Morrison. I was sent a advance copy of the book recently and my daughter loved the book. If your child loves nature he or she will love this book. Originally published 20 years ago by Scholastic, Long Live Earth’s brand new Anniversary edition is available for pre-order now through December 1st. Release date December 2nd. Here is your chance to win a signed copy. This book would also make a great gift and is available for preorder on Amazon.com and the authors website When you order from the authors website 10% of pre-order proceeds will be donated to 350.org, the global grassroots movement (co-founded by author/activist Bill McKibbon) working tirelessly to solve the climate crises.

This reflective tale is more timely, and more important, than ever…

Embark on a lyrical journey which begins at Earth’s very beginning, explores what people have done to our planet and charts a hopeful, united course towards the future. A must read now for budding environmentalists and anyone, young or old, who cares about the planet that we call home.

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A big thank you to  YOUR ORGANIC CHILD for sharing LONG LIVE EARTH with it’s wonderful following.

LONG LIVE EARTH ON PAPER ORANGES BLOG

My dear old friend Susanna featured Long Live Earth on her nifty blog.  Lots of great pics and products for young and old to be found at Susanna’s Paper Oranges.  Click her big Sourpuss to get from here to there.  Thanks Susanna!

She hasn't changed a bit.

She hasn’t changed a bit.